Friday
Mar012019

Oxford University Publishes Video Games and Violence Study

As many of you have heard many many times from me, "people who do not truly understand video games need to stop making dangerous assumptions about rumors that others put out there". There are way too many ill-informed individuals, be them parents or law-makers, who do not understand video games, and believe that if there is a hint of violence that their impressionable little ones will become mass shooters, or some other outlandishly violent vocation.

  • Are there some video games out there that have over the top violence?
    • YES
  • Should young kids play overly violent video games?
    • NO
  • But how can we stop kids from play these games?
    • There's a rating system for a reason, just like the movies. All a parent needs to do pay attention to the ratings right on the box.
  • But they could get access to violent video games at their friend's house...
    • (Be the better parent?) Inform the friend's parents about the games?

At this point I'm sure many out there are looking for some proof to my claims that there is no link between playing violent games and being increasingly violent in real life. So, here's the results of the Oxford University's Internet Institute's findings which are published at the Oxford's Royal Society Open Science Journal

As you will see this is quite the report that involved 1,004 different test subjects and in the words of one of the head researchers:

Despite interest in the topic by parents and policy-makers, the research has not demonstrated that there is cause for concern.

So parents of kids out there, video games will not make your children more violent. I would simply suggested you at least take a look at what they are playing and make the judgement call of if it is appropriate, in your opinion. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and as long as we all understand that everyone is entitled to their opinions, I think we'll be fine.

References (1)

References allow you to track sources for this article, as well as articles that were written in response to this article.

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>